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Dickens' Characters → Characters E-G

Dickens' Characters E-G

E

Emily ( David Copperfield ) Illustration Mr. Peggotty's niece and David Copperfield's childhood friend. She is later engaged to Ham but is lured away by the charms of David's friend Steerforth. Mr. Peggotty is heartbroken and searches for her, finally finding her when Steerforth tires of her and she leaves him. She later emigrates to Australia with her uncle, Mr. Peggotty. (top)

Endell, Martha ( David Copperfield ) Martha went to school with Emily and works with her at Omer's. She is disgraced in her hometown of Yarmouth and Emily gives her money to go to London where she becomes a prostitute. She later helps Mr. Peggotty find Emily and emigrates to Australia where she marries a farm-labourer. (top)

Estella ( Great Expectations ) Illustration Adopted as a child by Miss Havisham who teaches her to break men's hearts as revenge for Compeyson having left Miss Havisham at the altar years before. Pip meets Estella at Satis House and falls in love with her but she is cruel to him. Pip goes to London and becomes a gentleman and continues to adore Estella but she warns him that she is incapable of love. She later marries Bentley Drummle who mistreats her and she leaves him. Drummle dies and Estella and Pip meet two years later and vow to remain together. Estella is the daughter of Magwitch and Jagger's maid Molly. [She] was very pretty and seemed very proud. Estella was set to wreak Miss Havisham's revenge on men, and that she was not to be given to me until she had gratified it for a term. I saw in this, a reason for her being beforehand assigned to me. Sending her out to attract and torment and do mischief, Miss Havisham sent her with the malicious assurance that she was beyond the reach of all admirers, and that all who staked upon that cast were secured to lose. (top)

F

Fagin ( Oliver Twist ) Illustration A crafty old Jew who runs a thieve's school near Field Lane in Saffron Hill. Oliver falls in with Fagin's band when he runs away from the undertaker, Sowerberry. When Fagin attempts to help Monks destroy Oliver's reputation he is arrested and executed at Newgate. Fagin was based on real-life Jewish fence (receiver of stolen property), Ikey Soloman (1758-1850). A very old shrivelled Jew, whose villainous-looking and repulsive face was obscured by a quantity of matted red hair. He was dressed in a greasy flannel gown, with his throat bare. (top)

Fan ( A Christmas Carol ) Scrooge's sister, mother of his nephew Fred. She has died before the story begins but lives again in the 'shadows' shown to Scrooge by the Ghost of Christmas Past. She is based on Dickens' own sister Fanny who died of consumption at age 38.

`Always a delicate creature, whom a breath might have withered,' said the Ghost. `But she had a large heart.'

`So she had,' cried Scrooge. `You're right. I will not gainsay it, Spirit. God forbid.'

`She died a woman,' said the Ghost,' and had, as I think, children.'

`One child,' Scrooge returned.

`True,' said the Ghost. `Your nephew.'

Scrooge seemed uneasy in his mind; and answered briefly, `Yes.'
(top)

Fang, Mr ( Oliver Twist ) Magistrate to whom Oliver is brought after being falsely charged with picking Mr Brownlow's pocket. Modeled after notorious magistrate Allen Stewart Laing of the Hatton Garden Police Court. A lean, long-backed, stiff-necked, middle-sized man, with no great quantity of hair, and what he had, growing on the back and sides of his head. His face was stern, and much flushed. If he were really not in the habit of drinking rather more than was exactly good for him, he might have brought action against his countenance for libel, and have recovered heavy damages. (top)

Feeder, Mr ( Dombey and Son ) Assistant to Dr Blimber at the school in Brighton where Paul Dombey Jr attends. Later marries Blimber's daughter Cornelia and takes over the management of the school. (top)

Feenix, Lord (Cousin Feenix) ( Dombey and Son ) Cousin to Edith Granger (Dombey) who takes her in when she leaves Mr Dombey. A man about town, forty years ago; but he is still so juvenile in figure and in manner, and so well got up, that strangers are amazed when they discover latent wrinkles in his lordship's face, and crows' feet in his eyes. (top)

Fern, Will ( The Chimes ) Country laborer who comes to London with his niece Lillian to look for work. He is arrested for vagrancy and branded a troublemaker. He and Lillian run into Trotty Veck in the street and Trotty takes them in for the night. Will and Lillian's presence help to spark Trotty's dream in which Will becomes a desperate arsonist and Lillian a prostitute. (top)

Fezziwig ( A Christmas Carol ) Illustration Scrooge was apprenticed to 'Old Fezziwig' in his youth. Scrooge visits his old employer with the Ghost of Christmas Past and is reminded of what a kind, generous man he was. An old gentleman in a Welsh wig, sitting behind such a high desk, that if he had been two inches taller he must have knocked his head against the ceiling. (top)

Fezziwig, Mrs ( A Christmas Carol ) Illustration Fezziwig's wife and mother of his three daughters. One vast substantial smile. (top)

Fibbitson, Mrs ( David Copperfield ) Old woman and companion of Mrs Mell. Although it was a warm day, she seemed to think of nothing but the fire. I fancied she was jealous even of the saucepan on it; and I have reason to know that she took its impressment into the service of boiling my egg and broiling my bacon, in dudgeon; for I saw her, with my own discomfited eyes, shake her fist at me once, when those culinary operations were going on, and no one else was looking. The sun streamed in at the little window, but she sat with her own back and the back of the large chair towards it, screening the fire as if she were sedulously keeping IT warm, instead of it keeping her warm, and watching it in a most distrustful manner. The completion of the preparations for my breakfast, by relieving the fire, gave her such extreme joy that she laughed aloud - and a very unmelodious laugh she had, I must say. (top)

Fielding, May ( Cricket on the Hearth ) Former lover of Edward Plummer, she is reunited with him after nearly marrying Tackleton at the urging of her mother, Mrs Fielding. (top)

Fielding, Mrs ( Cricket on the Hearth ) Mother of May, who is in favor of May's pending marriage to the wealthy Tackleton. (top)

Fielding, Sir John ( Barnaby Rudge ) Blind half-brother of novelist Henry Fielding (Tom Jones). Magistrate at Bow Street. Dickens has him at the scene of the Gordon Riots when, in fact, Fielding was on his deathbed at the time of the riots. (top)

Filer ( The Chimes ) Friend of Alderman Cute, Filer makes Trotty feel guilty over his meager meal of tripe. (top)

Finching, Flora ( Little Dorrit ) Illustration Daughter of Casby and former sweetheart of Arthur Clennam who reappears 20 years later and "grown to be very broad, and short of breath." Dickens modeled the character of Flora after his own early sweetheart, Maria Beadnell, who reappears later in Dickens life not quite the way he remembered her. (top)

Fips, Mr ( Martin Chuzzlewit ) Old Martin Chuzzlewit's agent who hires Tom Pinch to put his library in order. Mr Fips was "small and spare, and looked peaceable, and wore black shorts and powder." (top)

Fizkin, Horatio ( Pickwick Papers ) Buff candidate in the election at Eatanswill. He is defeated by the Blue candidate, Samuel Slumkey. (top)

Fish, Mr. ( The Chimes ) Sir Joseph Bowley's confidential secretary. (top)

Fladdock, General ( Martin Chuzzlewit ) Introduced to Martin Chuzzlewit in America by the Norris family. While condemning the class system in Europe he is so outraged to be considered a fellow passenger to America with Martin, who made the trip in steerage, that "he almost laid his hand upon his sword." (top)

Fledgeby, "Fascination" ( Our Mutual Friend ) Moneylender who operates Pubsy & CO. Fledgeby employs the old Jewish man Riah as his front man. (top)

Fleming, Agnes ( Oliver Twist ) Mother of Oliver, whom she has out of wedlock with Edwin Leeford. Agnes is also the sister of Rose Maylie. (top)

Flintwinch, Jeremiah ( Little Dorrit ) Illustration Mrs. Clennam's clerk to whom her son Arthur relinquishes his share of the family business. He intrigues with his twin brother Ephraim against Mrs Clennam. Husband of Affery. (top)

Flintwinch, Ephraim ( Little Dorrit ) Twin brother of Jeremiah with whom he intrigues against Mrs Clennam. (top)

Flintwinch, Affery ( Little Dorrit ) Illustration Wife of Mrs. Clennam's clerk who sees the evil doings of the house in dreams. (top)

Flite, Miss ( Bleak House ) Illustration A slightly mad old woman who is a regular attendant at the court of Chancery expecting to receive a favorable judgement in a case that no one is sure has ever existed.A curious little old woman in a squeezed bonnet and carrying a reticule. (top)

Flopson ( Great Expectations ) One of Mrs Pocket's maids (along with Millers) who helps control the Pocket's 'tumbled up' children. (top)

Flowers ( Dombey and Son ) Maid to Mrs Skewton. (top)

Fluggers ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Member of Crummles' acting troupe. Does the heavy business. (top)

Folair, Augustus (Tommy) ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Pantomimist in Crummles' acting troupe, jealous of the attention paid to Ninetta Crummles, the 'infant phenomenon', he believes the crowds would be better entertained by his specialty: the Highland Fling. A shabby gentleman in an old pair of buff slippers came in at one powerful slide, and chattering his teeth, fiercely brandished a walking-stick. (top)

Fred ( A Christmas Carol ) Good hearted nephew of Ebenezer Scrooge, son of his sister Fan. His face was ruddy and handsome; his eyes sparkled. (top)

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Gabelle, Théophile ( A Tale of Two Cities ) Employee of Charles Darnay who finds himself imprisoned by the revolutionaries in Paris. Gabelle writes to Darnay who comes to Paris to aid Gabelle. Darnay is then put in prison for his trouble. (top)

Gallanbile, Mr ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Member of Parliament and client of the General Agency Office who is seeking a cook. Fifteen guineas, tea and sugar, and servants allowed to see male cousins, if godly. Note. Cold dinner in the kitchen on the Sabbath, Mr Gallanbile being devoted to the Observance question. No victuals whatever cooked on the Lord's Day, with the exception of dinner for Mr and Mrs Gallanbile, which, being a work of piety and necessity, is exempted. Mr Gallanbile dines late on the day of rest, in order to prevent the sinfulness of the cook's dressing herself. (top)

Game Chicken, The ( Dombey and Son ) Boxer that Toots hires to teach him the art. A stoical gentleman in a shaggy white great-coat and a flat-brimmed hat, with very short hair, a broken nose, and a considerable tract of bare and sterile country behind each ear." He "knocked Mr Toots about the head three times a week, for the small consideration of ten and six per visit. (top)

Gamfield, Mr ( Oliver Twist ) Illustration Chimneysweep who wants to apprentice Oliver. His request is denied when Oliver humbly objects. (top)

Gamp, Sairey ( Martin Chuzzlewit ) Illustration A midwife, nurse, and "layer out" of the dead, although she is much more concerned with her own creature comforts than those of her patients. Habitually in liquor, she creates the imaginary Mrs Harris whose good opinion is used to promote Mrs Gamp's character. Sairey Gamp is one of Dickens most intriguing characters. Meet Mrs Gamp. (top)

Gargery, Joe ( Great Expectations ) Illustration Blacksmith and friend to Pip, Joe is the husband of Pip's sister, who badly mistreats both Joe and Pip. After his wife's death Joe comes to London and nurses Pip through an illness. Later Joe marries Pip's friend Biddy. Joe was a fair man, with curls of flaxen hair on each side of his smooth face, and with eyes of such a very undecided blue that they seemed to have somehow got mixed with their own whites. He was a mild, good-natured, sweet-tempered, easy-going, foolish, dear fellow - a sort of Hercules in strength, and also in weakness. (top)

Gargery, Mrs Joe ( Great Expectations ) Illustration Wife of Joe Gargery and sister of Pip who cruelly mistreats them both, frequently going "on the rampage" and employing "the tickler" to beat them with. She is beaten by Orlick and later dies. My sister, Mrs. Joe, with black hair and eyes, had such a prevailing redness of skin that I sometimes used to wonder whether it was possible she washed herself with a nutmeg-grater instead of soap. She was tall and bony, and almost always wore a coarse apron, fastened over her figure behind with two loops, and having a square impregnable bib in front, that was stuck full of pins and needles. (top)

Garland, Abel ( The Old Curiosity Shop ) Son of Mr and Mrs Garland and resembles Mr Garland in face and figure. Abel is apprenticed to the notary Mr Witherden. (top)

Garland, Mr and Mrs ( The Old Curiosity Shop ) Kindly plump couple, parents of Abel, who befriend and hire Kit. They, along with Mr Witherden and the Single Gentleman, are instrumental in clearing Kit of false charges made by Brass. (top)

Gashford ( Barnaby Rudge ) Lord George Gordon's hypocritical secretary. He urges the rioters to exact revenge on Geoffrey Haredale, who had exposed his treacherous ways. He abandons Lord Gordon when the riots are suppressed by soldiers and becomes a government spy. He later poisons himself. (top)

Gaspard ( A Tale of Two Cities ) Parisian peasant whose child is killed when hit by the carriage of the Marquis de St Evremonde. The grief-stricken Gaspard follows the Marquis to his country home and kills him in his bed. Gaspard is hung on a 40-foot gallows over the town fountain. (top)

Gay, Walter ( Dombey and Son ) Illustration Sol Gill's nephew, he is employed in the house of Dombey and Son. Walter befriends Florence Dombey, her father is displeased and sends him to the firm's branch in Barbados. The ship in which he sails is lost and Sol goes to search for him. Walter returns and marries Florence. Mr. Dombey, after the failure of the house, goes to live with Walter and Florence. (top)

Gazingi, Miss ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Member of Crummles' acting troupe. There was Miss Gazingi, with an imitation ermine boa tied in a loose knot round her neck. (top)

General, Mrs ( Little Dorrit ) Matron hired as chaperone to "varnish" Amy and Fanny Dorrit. She admonishes the girls that reciting "Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism" is good for the lips. She has designs on William Dorrit but he dies before he can propose. (top)

George ( David Copperfield ) Guard on the coach when David Copperfield travels to school from Yarmouth to London. (top)

George ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Bachelor friend of the Kenwigs whose joke about Mr Lillyvick falls flat. (top)

Georgiana ( Great Expectations ) One of Miss Havisham's toady relations hoping to gain an inheritance. An indigestive single woman, who called her rigidity religion, and her liver love. (top)

Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come ( A Christmas Carol ) Shows Scrooge the demise of Tiny Tim and of himself, leading to Scrooge's reformation. It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand. But for this it would have been difficult to detach its figure from the night, and separate it from the darkness by which it was surrounded. (top)

Ghost of Christmas Past ( A Christmas Carol ) Shows Scrooge his lonely and difficult childhood and gradual decline into the miser he will become. It was a strange figure -- like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man, viewed through some supernatural medium, which gave him the appearance of having receded from the view, and being diminished to a child's proportions. Its hair, which hung about its neck and down its back, was white as if with age; and yet the face had not a wrinkle in it, and the tenderest bloom was on the skin. The arms were very long and muscular; the hands the same, as if its hold were of uncommon strength. Its legs and feet, most delicately formed, were, like those upper members, bare. It wore a tunic of the purest white, and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful. It held a branch of fresh green holly in its hand; and, in singular contradiction of that wintry emblem, had its dress trimmed with summer flowers. But the strangest thing about it was, that from the crown of its head there sprung a bright clear jet of light, by which all this was visible; and which was doubtless the occasion of its using, in its duller moments, a great extinguisher for a cap, which it now held under its arm. (top)

Ghost of Christmas Present ( A Christmas Carol ) Illustration Shows Scrooge the joy that Christmas brings, both at the poor household of the Cratchits and at the home of his nephew Fred. The ghost also introduces Scrooge to the children, Ignorance and Want. It was clothed in one simple green robe, or mantle, bordered with white fur. This garment hung so loosely on the figure, that its capacious breast was bare, as if disdaining to be warded or concealed by any artifice. Its feet, observable beneath the ample folds of the garment, were also bare; and on its head it wore no other covering than a holly wreath, set here and there with shining icicles. Its dark brown curls were long and free; free as its genial face, its sparkling eye, its open hand, its cheery voice, its unconstrained demeanour, and its joyful air. Girded round its middle was an antique scabbard; but no sword was in it, and the ancient sheath was eaten up with rust. (top)

Giles, Mr ( Oliver Twist ) Butler and steward to Mrs Maylie. He, Brittles, and a traveling tinker give a half-hearted chase of Sikes, Crackit, and Oliver after the attempted burglary of the Maylie home. The fattest man of the party. (top)

Gills, Soloman ( Dombey and Son ) Illustration Proprietor of a of a ship's chandler shop called The Wooden Midshipman. When his nephew Walter Gay's ship is lost at sea Solomon goes in search of him, leaving the care of the shop to his friend, Capt. Cuttle.An elderly gentleman in a Welsh wig...he wore a very precise shirt-frill, and carried a pair of first-rate spectacles on his forehead, and a tremendous chronometer in his fob. (top)

Glavormelly, Mr ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Deceased acting friend of Mr Snevellicci. (top)

Gordon, Emma ( Hard Times ) Member of Sleary's circus troupe who was "like a mother" to Sissy Jupe. After her first husband is killed falling off an elephant she later marries a cheesemonger. (top)

Gordon, Lord George ( Barnaby Rudge ) 1750-1793 Historical figure and leader of the Gordon (anti-Catholic) Riots (1780) (top)

Gowan, Henry ( Little Dorrit ) Illustration Untalented artist who marries Pet Meagles against her parents wishes. Henry's snobbish mother feigns disappointment at her son's marrying beneath himself. Gowan had earlier jilted Miss Wade. (top)

Gradgrind, Adam Smith ( Hard Times ) Younger son of Thomas Gradgrind. (top)

Gradgrind, Jane ( Hard Times ) Younger daughter of Thomas Gradgrind. (top)

Gradgrind, Louisa ( Hard Times ) Oldest daughter of Thomas. She marries Bounderby, whom she doesn't love. She later leaves her husband and returns to her father. There was an air of jaded sullenness...particularly in the girl: yet, struggling through the dissatisfaction of her face, there was a light with nothing to rest upon, a fire with nothing to burn, a starved imagination keeping life in itself somehow, which brightened its expression. Not with the brightness natural to cheerful youth, but with uncertain, eager, doubtful flashes, which had something painful in them, analogous to the changes on a blind face groping its way. (top)

Gradgrind, Malthus ( Hard Times ) Younger son of Thomas Gradgrind. (top)

Gradgrind, Mrs. ( Hard Times ) Ailing wife of Thomas Gradgrind. A little, thin, white, pink-eyed bundle of shawls, of surpassing feebleness, mental and bodily; who was always taking physic without any effect, and who, whenever she showed a symptom of coming to life, was invariably stunned by some weighty piece of fact tumbling on her. (top)

Gradgrind, Thomas ( Hard Times ) Retired wholesale hardware merchant and father of Louisa and Tom. He runs a school and emphasizes the importance of facts and figures over fancy to his students and his children. By the end of the story he learns that facts and figures must be tempered by love and forbearance. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's square wall of a forehead, which had his eyebrows for its base, while his eyes found commodious cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside. The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders, - nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was, - all helped the emphasis. (top)

Gradgrind, Tom ( Hard Times ) Son of Thomas. He is employed at Bounderby's bank which he later robs. After a botched attempt to frame Stephen Blackpool for the crime he leaves the country with the aid of Sleary and his circus troupe. A sullen young fellow, and ungracious in his manner. (top)

Graham, Mary ( Martin Chuzzlewit ) Mary cares for old Martin Chuzzlewit with the knowledge that she will not profit from Martin's wealth after his death. Chuzzlewit's grandson, Martin, falls in love with Mary which displeases his grandfather who disinherits young Martin. Young Martin goes to America to seek his fortune. Finding only sickness and misery in America, Martin returns to England, is reconciled with his grandfather and marries Mary. (top)

Grainger ( David Copperfield ) Friend of Steerforth's who has dinner with David Copperfield at his chambers at Buckingham Street. Gay and lively fellow...something older than Steerforth. (top)

Granger, Edith ( Dombey and Son ) Illustration Paul Dombey's second wife is the widow of Colonel Granger and the daughter of Mrs Skewton. She marries Dombey but does not love him. She later elopes with Carker, a manager at Dombey's firm, to punish her husband. "It was a remarkable characteristic of this lady's beauty that it appeared to vaunt and assert itself without her aid, and against her will. She knew that she was beautiful: it was impossible that it could be otherwise: but she seemed with her own pride to defy her very self." (top)

Grannett, Mr ( Oliver Twist ) Overseer at the workhouse where Oliver was born. Known for his cruelty to the paupers. (top)

Graymarsh ( Nicholas Nickleby ) A student at Dotheboys Hall. His maternal aunt (in reality his mother) would have sent the two pairs of stockings but was short of money. (top)

Grayper, Mr and Mrs ( David Copperfield ) Neighbors of Clara Copperfield in Blunderstone. Later they emigrate to South America. (top)

Green, Miss ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Friend of the Kenwigs. (top)

Gregory ( David Copperfield ) Foreman of the packers at the Murdstone and Grinby wine warehouse during David Copperfield's time there. (top)

Gregsbury, Mr ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Great member of parliament, of Manchester Buildings, Westminster, wanted a young man to keep his papers and correspondence in order. Nicholas responded to the advertisment and decided that Mr Gregsbury actually wanted someone to do his job for him and declined. He was a tough, burly, thick-headed gentleman, with a loud voice, a pompous manner, a tolerable command of sentences with no meaning in them, and, in short, every requisite for a very good member indeed. (top)

Gregsbury, Mrs ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Wife of Mr Gregsbury MP. (top)

Grewgious ( The Mystery of Edwin Drood ) Illustration Guardian of Rosa Bud. He is upset at John Jasper's advances to Rosa and finds her lodging in London at an apartment owned by Mrs Billickin. He later investigates the disappearance of Edwin Drood and is suspicious of Jasper. Described as "an angular man with no conversational powers." (top)

Gride, Arthur ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Old moneylender who develops a scheme, along with fellow usurer, Ralph Nickleby, to get Walter Bray's consent to give his daughter, Madeline's, hand for the forgiveness of debts to Gride and Ralph. Gride's plan is undone when Bray dies on the morning of the wedding and his old housekeeper, Peg Sliderskew, jealous of the young wife, steals documents that reveal his scheme. Gride is murdered by burglars before he can be prosecuted. A little old man, of about seventy or seventy-five years of age, of a very lean figure, much bent and slightly twisted. He wore a grey coat with a very narrow collar, an old-fashioned waistcoat of ribbed black silk, and such scanty trousers as displayed his shrunken spindle-shanks in their full ugliness. The only articles of display or ornament in his dress were a steel watch-chain to which were attached some large gold seals; and a black ribbon into which, in compliance with an old fashion scarcely ever observed in these days, his grey hair was gathered behind. His nose and chin were sharp and prominent, his jaws had fallen inwards from loss of teeth, his face was shrivelled and yellow, save where the cheeks were streaked with the colour of a dry winter apple; and where his beard had been, there lingered yet a few grey tufts which seemed, like the ragged eyebrows, to denote the badness of the soil from which they sprung. The whole air and attitude of the form was one of stealthy cat-like obsequiousness; the whole expression of the face was concentrated in a wrinkled leer, compounded of cunning, lecherousness, slyness, and avarice. (top)

Gridley ( Bleak House ) Known as the 'Man from Shropshire' and another casualty of Chancery. He was a tall, sallow man with a careworn head on which but little hair remained, a deeply lined face, and prominent eyes. He had a combative look and a chafing, irritable manner which, associated with his figure--still large and powerful, though evidently in its decline--rather alarmed me. He had a pen in his hand, and in the glimpse I caught of his room in passing, I saw that it was covered with a litter of papers. (top)

Grimble, Sir Thomas ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Acquaintance of Mrs Nickleby in Yorkshire. A very proud man...with six grown-up and most lovely daughters, and the finest park in the county. (top)

Grimwig, Mr. ( Oliver Twist ) Cantankerous friend of Mr. Brownlow. Quote: "I'll eat my head!" Supporting himself by a thick stick: a stout old gentleman, rather lame in one leg, who was dressed in a blue coat, striped waistcoat, nankeen breeches and gaiters, and a broad-brimmed white hat, with the sides turned up with green. A very small-plaited shirt frill stuck out from his waistcoat; and a very long steel watch-chain, with nothing but a key at the end, dangled loosely below it. The ends of his white neckerchief were twisted into a ball about the size of an orange; the variety of shapes into which his countenance was twisted, defy description. He had a manner of screwing his head on one side when he spoke; and of looking out of the corners of his eyes at the same time: which irresistibly reminded the beholder of a parrot. (top)

Grubble, W. ( Bleak House ) Proprietor of the Dedlock Arms tavern. A pleasant-looking, stoutish, middle-aged man who never seemed to consider himself cozily dressed for his own fire-side without his hat and top-boots, but who never wore a coat except at church. (top)

Grudden, Mrs ( Nicholas Nickleby ) Useful assistant of Mrs Crummles. In a brown cloth pelisse and a beaver bonnet, who assisted Mrs. Crummles in her domestic affairs, and took money at the doors, and dressed the ladies, and swept the house, and held the prompt book when everybody else was on for the last scene, and acted any kind of part on any emergency without ever learning it, and was put down in the bills under my name or names whatever, that occurred to Mr. Crummles as looking well in print. (top)

Grueby, John ( Barnaby Rudge ) Loyal servant of Lord George Gordon who tries to isolate Gordon from the rioters when the protest turns to violence. (top)

Gulpidge, Mr and Mrs ( David Copperfield ) Guests at a dinner party given by the Waterbrooks. Mr Gulpidge had something to do at second-hand with the law business of the Bank. (top)

Gummidge, Mr ( David Copperfield ) Deceased former partner of Daniel Peggotty and husband of Mrs Gummidge who died very poor. (top)

Gummidge, Mrs ( David Copperfield ) Illustration Widow of Mr. Peggotty's former partner, who had died very poor. She lives with Mr. Peggotty and later emigrates to Australia with him. Quote: I'm a lone lorn creetur and everythink goes contrary with me. (top)

Guppy, Mrs ( Bleak House ) Illustration William Guppy's mother. She was an old lady in a large cap, with rather a red nose and rather an unsteady eye, but smiling all over. (top)

Guppy, William ( Bleak House ) Illustration Clerk for Kenge and Carboy. Proposes marriage to Esther Summerson which she refuses. Guppy is involved in the investigation of Lady Dedlock's secret. Esther describes him as he declares his love for her: I scarcely knew him again, he was so uncommonly smart. He had an entirely new suit of glossy clothes on, a shining hat, lilac-kid gloves, a neckerchief of a variety of colours, a large hot-house flower in his button-hole, and a thick gold ring on his little finger. Besides which, he quite scented the dining-room with bear's-grease and other perfumery. (top)

Gusher, Mr. ( Bleak House ) Friend of Mrs Pardiggle. A flabby gentleman with a moist surface and eyes so much too small for his moon of a face that they seemed to have been originally made for somebody else. (top)

Guster ( Bleak House ) Mrs Snagsby's maid. The name of Guster is the only possession except fifty shillings per annum and a very small box indifferently filled with clothing, of a lean young woman from a workhouse (by some supposed to have been christened Augusta) who, although she was farmed or contracted for during her growing time by an amiable benefactor of his species resident at Tooting, and cannot fail to have been developed under the most favourable circumstances, 'has fits,' which the parish can't account for... Really aged three or four and twenty, but looking a round ten years older. (top)