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New! Redrawn and updated for 2012! High-resolution version of the Dickens' London map , suitable for printing poster-size, available to download. 6 megabyte image includes descriptions of all the places shown on the map. Get details...
Additional information available at each location:

1859 Map - The selected location on the 1859 map of London, courtesy of UCLA, and created by Ralph R. Frerichs. From the map, further detail is available.

1879 Dictionary - Description of that location taken from the 1879 Dickens's Dictionary of London by Charles Dickens Jr. compiled for the web by Lee Jackson, who has also compiled The Victorian Dictionary.

Google Map - The selected location in London today, courtesy of Google Maps. From here further zoom and pan, aerial photography, and street view are available.

Photo - Displays photos of the location

Wikipedia - Additional information on that location in Wikipedia

See this page for London locations listed by novel

Map last updated April 2014

Note:
This map and the information it contains is by no means meant to be all-inclusive or complete. It was designed to provide the reader of Dickens' works with a better understanding of the places that occur in the novels. It will continue to be updated and additional information is solicited. All additional information will be confirmed and added as it is received.

David Perdue
The Charles Dickens Page



Aldgate (Map: C-12) - Main entrance from the East to the Medieval walled city.
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The Adelphi (Map: D-6) - Elegant housing complex along the Thames built by the Adam brothers in the 1760s and torn down in the 1930s. Dickens had lodgings here as a young man. David Copperfield lodges in Mrs Crupp's house here (David Copperfield). Arthur Clennam follows Miss Wade to the Adelphi where she meets Riguad (Little Dorrit). Dickens visited the Adelphi Theatre here.
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Astley's Royal Equestrian Amphitheatre (Map: F-7) - Popular outdoor amphitheatre which mixed theatre with circus including equestrian performances. Robert Astley, who opened the theatre in 1774, is considered a pioneer of the modern circus. Dickens described it in Astley's (Sketches by Boz). Kit takes his mother to Astley's (Old Curiosity Shop). Mr George goes to Astley's and is much delighted with the horses and feats of strength (Bleak House).
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Bank of England (Map: C-11) - Established in 1694, and known as the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street, the Bank was privately owned until 1946 when it was nationalized and came under government control. It is referred to in many of Dickens' works.
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Bedlam (Map: G-7) - Officially Bethlehem Hospital, a hospital for the insane. On contemplating the lunacy of his clerk, Bob Cratchit, taking on a wife and family on 15 shillings a week, Scrooge laments "I'll retire to Bedlam" (A Christmas Carol). Dickens uses the term "bedlam" to describe any act of lunacy.
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Belgrave Square (Map: G-3) - Fashionable square in Belgravia, named for the Lord Grosvenor who also had the title of Viscount Belgrave. Formerly a swamp filled in and developed by Thomas Cubitt in 1825. The Wititterly's live near here (Nicholas Nickleby).
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Bevis Marks (Map: C-12) - Street in the Aldgate ward of the City. Sampson and Sally Brass have an office at No. 10. (The Old Curiosity Shop).
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Billingsgate (Map: D-11) - London's fish market for centuries.
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Bishopsgate (Map: C-11) - Northern gate in the walled medieval city. One of the Gordon rioters was hanged at Bishopsgate (Barnaby Rudge). Brogley, 'sworn broker and appraiser', kept a second-hand furniture shop at Bishopsgate (Dombey and Son).
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Blackfriars Bridge (Map: D-8) - Bridge over the Thames built in the late 1700's, demolished in 1863 and rebuilt in 1899. The Black Friars were Dominican monks who set up a priory in the area in 1221. The name distinguished them from the adjacent priory of Carmelite monks, the White Friars, at Bridewell. Hugh broke open the tollhouses there during the Gordon Riots (Barnaby Rudge). Jo stops to rest and eat at Blackfriars bridge and gazes upon the cross atop St Paul's (Bleak House). Dickens frequently crossed this bridge while working at Warren's Boot Blacking factory to visit his family at the Marshalsea prison in Southwark.
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Bleeding Heart Yard - A cobbled courtyard off Greville Street in the Farringdon area of the City of London. The courtyard is probably named after a 16th-century inn sign dating back to the Reformation that was displayed on a pub called the Bleeding Heart in nearby Charles Street. The sign showed the heart of the Virgin Mary pierced by five swords. The Plornish family lives here and the factory owned by Doyce and Clennam was here (Little Dorrit).
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Bloomsbury (Map: B-6) - Residential area of Holborn. Dickens lived at Tavistock House here from 1851-1860. Barnaby Rudge is to be hanged in Bloomsbury Square for his part in the Gordon Riots (Barnaby Rudge).
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Bond Street (Map: D-3) - Area of Fashionable shops in Northwest London. It is referred to in Dickens' works as a well to do area of London. Mrs. Billickin, describing the residence which Mr. Grewgious is considering renting for Rosa, says "It is not Bond Street nor yet St. James's Palace; but it is not pretended that it is." (The Mystery of Edwin Drood).
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The Borough (Map: F-10) - Area south of London bridge in Southwark. It was at the White Hart Inn, in the Borough, that Pickwick meets Sam Weller and Pickwick and Wardle catch up with Jingle and Rachael after their mad dash to be married (Pickwick Papers).
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Brick Lane (Map: B-13) - Home of the Brick Lane Branch of the United Grand Junction Ebenezer Temperance Association where Mr Weller's wife is a member (Pickwick Papers).
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British Museum (Map: B-5) - The collection was originally housed at Montagu House, Bloomsbury and opened in 1759 although public access was limited. David and Steerforth visit the Museum there. (David Copperfield) The current neo-classical building was completed in 1852.
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Buckingham Palace (Map: F-3) - Built by John Sheffield, 1st duke of Buckingham, in 1703. Purchased for the royal family in 1761 by George III. It became the official London residence of the monarchy in 1837 when Queen Victoria moved there.
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Buckingham Street (Map: E-6) - David Copperfield takes lodging with Mrs Crupp at number 15 here (David Copperfield). Dickens lived in the same house briefly in 1834 while working as a parliamentary reporter.
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Bull Inn (Map: D-12) - Coaching Inn in Aldgate. It was at its zenith shortly before the advent of railways, when Mrs. Anne Nelson, coach proprietor, was the landlady. It has been said that she could make up nearly 200 beds there, and she lodged and boarded about three dozen of her guards and coachmen. Most of her business was to Essex and Suffolk, but she also owned the Exeter coach [1]. Samuel Pickwick and his friends start for Ipswich from here (Pickwick Papers).
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Camden Town (Map: A-3) - Area of northwest London. Dickens' family lived at 16 Bayham Street here. The Cratchits (A Christmas Carol), the Micawbers (David Copperfield), and Polly Toodles family (Dombey and Son) also lived in Camden Town.
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Cannon Street (Map: D-10) - Street leading from St. Paul's-churchyard to the end of King William-street. Its construction relieved Cheapside of the greater part of the heavy traffic.
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Cavendish Square (Map: C-3) - Fashionable square in west London. Madame Mantalini has her dressmaking shop here (Nicholas Nickleby). The Merdles lived in Cavendish Square (Little Dorrit). Lord George Gordon lives near the square (Barnaby Rudge). Silas Wegg maintains a stall near the house the Boffins later occupy near Cavendish Square (Our Mutual Friend).
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Chancery Lane (Map: C-7) - In Dickens' time Chancery cases were heard at Lincoln's Inn Hall off Chancery lane. Jarndyce and Jarndyce was heard here, Krook's Rag and Bone Shop, where Miss Flite and Nemo/Captain Hawdon have rooms, and the residences of the Jellybys and the Snagsbys were in the vicinity of Chancery Lane (Bleak House).
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Charing Cross (Map: E-5) - District of London named for the last of the stone crosses erected by Edward I in 1291 to mark the stops of Queen Eleanor's funeral procession from Nottinghamshire to Westminster Abbey. The present monument was erected in 1865. The Pickwickians begin their travels at the Golden Cross Hotel here (Pickwick Papers). David Copperfield stayed at the same hotel referring to it as "a mouldy sort of establishment in a close neighborhood" (David Copperfield).
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Cheapside (Map: C-9) - Medieval London's shopping district, ceap was Old English for market. Mould, the undertaker, lives here (Martin Chuzzlewit). Pickwick is taken to meet Tony Weller at an inn in Cheapside (Pickwick Papers).
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Chelsea (Map: I-3) - Residential area of west London where Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836. Richard Carstone studies medicine at Mr. Bayham Badger's in Chelsea (Bleak House). Sophy Wackles lives with her widowed mother and two sister, with whom she runs a day-school for girls, in Chelsea (Old Curiosity Shop).
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Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese (Map: C-8) - This charming little pub was frequented by Dickens. The present building dates from 1667 when it was rebuilt after the Great Fire. Charles Darnay accompanies Sydney Carton "down Ludgate hill to Fleet Street, and so, up a covered way, into a tavern. Here, they were shown into a little room, where Charles Darnay was soon recruiting his strength with a good plain dinner and good wine." This almost certainly the Cheshire Cheese (A Tale of Two Cities).
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The City (Map: D-11) - Area of London comprising the walled Medieval city, most of which was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666. In Dickens' time the City was evolving from a residential area to a banking and finance center, the former residents moving to the western and northern suburbs and commuting to the City as mass transportation was introduced. Scrooge (A Christmas Carol), Paul Dombey (Dombey and Son), Anthony Chuzzlewit (Martin Chuzzlewit) and Fascination Fledgeby (Our Mutual Friend) have businesses in the City.
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City Road (Map: B-11) - The Micawbers have a residence here (David Copperfield), Florence Dombey is kidnapped by old Mrs Brown here (Dombey and Son).
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Clerkenwell (Map: B-8) - Area of northern London in Holborn. Gabriel Varden's locksmith shop, the Golden Key, is in Clerkenwell (Barnaby Rudge). Jarvis Lorry, clerk at Tellson's bank, lives in Clerkenwell (A Tale of Two Cities). Fagin's lair is located in the Clerkenwell area (Oliver Twist). Present day photos of scenes in the Clerkenwell area.
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Cornhill (Map: D-10) - Well-known thouroughfare in The City named for a corn market once held there. Dodson and Fogg have offices "on a ground floor front of a dingy house, at the furthest end of Freeman's Court, Cornhill (Pickwick Papers). Bob Cratchit passes Cornhill on his way home to Camden Town and slides down the ice (A Christmas Carol).
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Covent Garden (Map: D-6) - District of London named for a fruit, vegetable and flower market designed by Inigo Jones in 1632. The Covent Garden Theatre is located here. David Copperfield bought flowers for Dora in the market and attends Julius Caesar at the theatre (David Copperfield). Pip spends the night at Hummums Hotel in Covent Garden when given a note from Wemmick not to go home (Great Expectations). Arthur Clennam has lodgings here (Little Dorrit). Job Trotter spends the night in a vegetable basket in Covent Garden (Pickwick Papers). The Bow Street Runners, London's first regular detective force, mentioned in Oliver Twist and Great Expectations, operated from Bow Street near Covent Garden.
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Crystal Palace (Map: F-1) - The exhibition hall built in Hyde Park by Joseph Paxton for the Great Exhibition of 1851. The exhibition was the idea of Prince Albert, who conceived it to celebrate the Industrial Revolution. Dickens visited the Exhibition in 1851. The Crystal Palace was moved to Sydenham, in south London, in 1854 and accidentally burned down in 1936.
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Devonshire Terrace (Map: B-2) - Dickens home from 1839 to 1851 located opposite the York Gate entrance to Regent's Park. Five of Dickens' children were born here. The house was destroyed in 1960.
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Doctors Commons (Map: D-8) - The College of the Doctors of the Law, founded in 1768. Dickens had an office here when he was a reporter and described it in Doctors' Commons (Sketches by Boz). David Copperfield becomes an articled clerk here (David Copperfield). Jingle applies for his marriage license here when he elopes with Rachael Wardle (Pickwick Papers).
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Doughty Street (Map: B-6) - Dickens' home from 1837 to 1839. Dickens' early fame allowed him to take a three year lease here. His beloved sister-in-law, Mary, died here. The home was purchased by The Dickens Fellowship and was opened to the public as the Dickens House Museum in 1925.
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Drury Lane (Map: C-6) - London street famous for the Drury Lane Theatre where Miss Petowker of the Crummles Company performed (Nicholas Nickleby). David Copperfield orders beef in a restaurant here (David Copperfield), and Dick Swiveler has lodgings over a tobacconist's shop here (Curiosity Shop). In the sketch Gin-Shops (Sketches by Boz) Dickens reports that "the gin-shops in and near Drury-Lane, Holborn, St. Giles's, Covent-garden, and Clare-market, are the handsomest in London. There is more of filth and squalid misery near those great thorough-fares than in any part of this mighty city." In the sketch The Pawnbroker's Shop (Sketches by Boz), Dickens describes a pawnbroker's shop near Drury Lane.
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Fleet Prison (Map: C-8) - The oldest of London's prisons, built in 1197 on the bank of the Fleet river. Used as a debtor's prison in Dickens' time, in use until 1842, it was demolished in 1846. Pickwick was imprisoned here until such time as damages and costs to Mrs. Bardell were paid, which Pickwick claimed would be "a good, long time" (Pickwick Papers).
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Fleet Street (Map: C-8) - Situated between The City and Whitehall, Fleet Street was where London's Press operated. Working as a young reporter Dickens was well acquainted with this area. David Copperfield, like Dickens, spent a lot of time in this street and takes Peggotty to a Waxwork on Fleet Street (David Copperfield).
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Foundling Hospital (Map: A-6) - Orphanage established in 1739 by Captain Thomas Coram, retired merchant seaman. The Meagles adopt Tattycoram from here (Little Dorrit). The Boot, tavern which served as headquarters for the Gordon rioters, was located in the fields behind the Foundling Hospital (Barbaby Rudge).
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Furnival's Inn - One of the Inns of Court, its use as a legal community was discontinued in 1818 and the buildings were rented out as chambers. Dickens lived here from 1834-1837, wrote most of Pickwick here, and married Catherine while living here. Rosa Bud stays in rooms in the Inn (Edwin Drood). John Westlock has rooms here (Martin Chuzzlewit).
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George and Vulture Inn (Map: D-11) Originally established in the 1600s and still operating today. Samuel Pickwick stays here when he returns to London for the Bardell trial. The Winkles also stay here after their marriage (Pickwick Papers).
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George Inn (Map: F-10) Last of the galleried coaching inns that dotted this area in Dickens' time. In the time before the coming of the railroad (1830s) coaching inns offered food, drink and warmth to the traveler coming into London by coach. The George is mentioned in (Little Dorrit). Also in the area were the Tabard Inn, where the pilgrims depart for Canterbury in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (demolished 1873), and the White Hart, where Mr. Pickwick and his friends depart on their own pilgrimage (Pickwick Papers). It is supposed that Shakespeare appeared in plays which were a frequent attraction in the yards of these inns.
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Golden Square (Map: D-4) Once fashionable square in west London. Ralph Nickleby lives here, the Kenwigs and Newman Noggs live nearby (Nicholas Nickleby). Mr. Peggotty finds little Emily in the vicinity of Golden Square (David Copperfield).
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Gray's Inn (Map: B-7) - One of the four Inns of Court, Dickens was a solicitor's clerk here in 1828. Pickwick's solicitor, Mr. Perker, has chambers at Gray's Inn (Pickwick Papers). Traddles has chambers at Gray's Inn (David Copperfield). Pip and Herbert have dilapidated chambers at Barnard's Inn in this same area (Great Expectations).
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Green Park (Map: F-2) - One of the royal parks, officially property of the Royal Family. Originally part of the grounds of St. James Palace.
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Grosvenor Square (Map: D-2) - The heart of the Grosvenor family's Mayfair Estate, this area was the center of London high society for over two centuries. Lord Rockingham's house in Grosvenor Square is blockaded against the Gordon rioters (Barnaby Rudge). Mr. Tite Barnacle lived in Grosvenor Square 'or very near it' (Little Dorrit).
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Guildhall (Map: C-10) - Site of London's city government. The trial of Pickwick and Bardell took place here (Pickwick Papers).
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Guy's Hospital (Map: F-11) - Teaching hospital in Southwark endowed by wealthy printer and publisher Thomas Guy (1645-1724) and built in 1721-24. Bob Sawyer is a medical student here (Pickwick Papers). Mrs Gamp's husband died at the hospital (Martin Chuzzlewit).
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Holborn (Map: B-7) - Area of London named for a thoroughfare running from Tottenham Ct. Road to Newgate. Langdale's wine and spirits warehouse on Holborn Hill is burned by the rioters and the Newgate prisoners escape up Holborn when the prison is taken (Barnaby Rudge). Mrs. Gamp lived at Kingsgate Street, High Holborn (Martin Chuzzlewit). Traddles lived on Castle Street, Holborn (David Copperfield). Fagin's den of thieves is located at Saffron Hill, a notorious criminal district, in Holborn (Oliver Twist). Bleeding Heart Yard is located in Holborn (Little Dorrit).
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Horsemonger Lane Gaol (Map: G-10) - Dickens witnessed the execution of the Mannings here in 1849. He later based the character of Hortense (Bleak House) on Maria Manning. Mrs Chivery's tobacco shop is located on Horsemonger lane (Little Dorrit).
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Houses of Parliament (Map: F-6) - The old Houses of Parliament burned down in 1834 and were housed in temporary structures until the present Houses were completed in 1860. Dickens worked as a parliamentary reporter 1831-36.
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Hyde Park (Map: E-1) - The largest of the London parks, Hyde Park was once a royal deer park enclosed by Henry VIII. It was opened to the public in the early 17th century. Its famous bridle path, Rotten Row, and manmade lake, The Serpentine, are among its most popular attractions. The Great Exhibition was held here in 1851.
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Jacob's Island (Map: F-13) - Island in the Thames where Toby Crackit's house is located. Bill Sikes is chased here after killing Nancy and accidentally hangs himself (Oliver Twist).
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Kensington (Map: G-1) - Fashionable suburb in west London. Prince Turveydrop teaches in a dance academy here (Bleak House).
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The Kings Bench Prison (Map: F-9) - Debtor's prison in Southwark. Mr. Micawber was imprisoned for debt here (David Copperfield). Madeline Bray and her father lived in the Rules of the King's Bench where better off prisoners were kept (Nicholas Nickleby). Mr Rugg tries to persuade Arthur Clennam to make himself an inmate of the newer and more spacious King's Bench rather than the Marshalsea (Little Dorrit).
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Lambeth (Map: G-7) - Slum district of river warehouses across the river from Westminster. The Lawyer Mr. Guppy intends to set himself up professionally in Walcot Square, Lambeth (Bleak House). Peg Sliderskew hides in Lambeth after stealing Gride's papers (Nicholas Nickleby).
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Lambeth Palace (Map: H-6) - The official residence of the archbishop of Canterbury. The Gordon rioters attack Lambeth Palace (Barnaby Rudge).
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Lant Street (Map: F-10) - Street in the Borough where 12-year-old Dickens had lodgings in a rented attic while his father was in the Marshalsea prison for debt. Bob Sawyer, a medical student at nearby Guy's Hospital, has lodgings here (Pickwick Papers).

Dickens describes Lant Street in Pickwick Papers:

"There is a repose about Lant Street, in the Borough, which sheds a gentle melancholy upon the soul. There are always a good many houses to let in the street: it is a by-street too, and its dulness is soothing. A house in Lant Street would not come within the denomination of a first-rate residence, in the strict acceptation of the term; but it is a most desirable spot nevertheless. If a man wished to abstract himself from the world--to remove himself from within the reach of temptation-- to place himself beyond the possibility of any inducement to look out of the window--we should recommend him by all means go to Lant Street."

Lant Street photographed in 1935 for MGM Studios in preparation for filming the 1935 film David Copperfield.
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Leadenhall Street (Map: C-12) - Street and market in the City. Tim Linkinwater tells Nicholas, when comparing London to the countryside, that he can buy new-laid eggs in Leadenhall Market any morning before breakfast (Nicholas Nickleby). The offices of Dombey and Son are thought to be in Leadenhall Street (Dombey and Son). Mr Pickwick meets Tony Weller at the Blue Boar Inn in Leadenhall Market (Pickwick Papers).
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Leicester Square (Map: D-5) - Square laid out in the late 17th century (pronounced les-ter square). In Dickens' time it contained an equestrian Statue of George I which was removed in the late 19th century after being vandalized. Mr. George's shooting gallery was near here (Bleak House).
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Lincolns Inn Fields (Map: C-7) - Designed by William Newton in the early 1600's as a compromise between the lawyers of Lincoln's Inn and developers wanting to build in the area. Newton was allowed to build around the perimeter of the Fields as long as the central part remained forever open. Jarndyce and Jarndyce begins at the Court of Chancery at Lincoln's Inn and the lawyer Tulkinghorn has a home in the Fields (Bleak House). Betsy Trotwood lived in the Fields (David Copperfield).
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London Bridge (Map: E-11) - Until 1750 London Bridge was the only bridge over the Thames in London. A bridge at this site dates from Roman times. The first stone London Bridge was built in 1176. This bridge eventually had houses, shops, and a church built upon it until they were removed in 1763. In 1831 it was replaced by a granite bridge designed by John Rennie. The Rennie London Bridge was replaced in 1972 and Rennie's bridge was dismantled and rebuilt in Lake Havasu, Arizona. One of the arches of the Rennie London Bridge still supports the southern end of the current London Bridge (photos).

Trying to save Oliver, Nancy meets Rose and Mr. Brownlow on the steps of London Bridge. She is observed by Noah Claypole which leads to her murder (Oliver Twist). David Copperfield, like Dickens, liked to sit on London Bridge and watch the people go by (David Copperfield). Gabriel Varden, the locksmith, crosses London Bridge to visit Mrs. Rudge in Southwark (Barnaby Rudge).
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Ludgate (Map: C-8) - Gate in the Medieval City's wall where Fleet Street joins the City. London's first daily newspaper, the Daily Courant, began publication near Ludgate in 1702 thus Fleet Street became the home of London's press.
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Mansion House (Map: D-10) - Official residence of London's Lord Mayor. Built in the mid 18th century by George Dance the Elder. Haredale appeals unsuccessfully to the Lord Mayor at the Mansion House to imprison Rudge (Barnaby Rudge).
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The Marshalsea (Map: F-10) - Debtor's prison in Southwark where Dickens' father was imprisoned in 1824. The prison dates from medieval times and was closed in 1842. Amy Dorrit's father, William, was also imprisoned at the Marshalsea and St. George's church where Amy Dorrit was christened and married is adjacent to the Marshalsea (Little Dorrit).
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Millbank (Map: H-5) - Area along the north side of the Thames. An undeveloped wasteland in Dickens' time. David and Daniel Peggotty follow Martha to this area (David Copperfield). Jenny Wren's home, at Smith Square, is in this area (Our Mutual Friend).
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Millbank Peniteniary (Map: H-5) - The Millbank Peniteniary was built between 1812 and 1828, it closed in 1890 and was demolished two years later. Today the Tate Britain museum stands on this spot.
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Model Prison (Map: A-7) - Experimental prison in Pentonville established in 1842. The prison adopted 'the separate system', keeping the prisoners isolated from one another. Dickens voiced "grave objections" to this system in Pet Prisoners (Household Words) April 1850. The prison is satirized in David Copperfield.
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The Monument (Map: D-11) - 200 foot high column, designed by Christopher Wren, marking the site of the origin of the devastating fire that destroyed much of London in September, 1666. John Willet tells his son Joe that climbing to the top of the Monument is the preferred diversion when visiting London (Barnaby Rudge). David Copperfield passes time by stopping on old London Bridge and gazing at the flame atop the Monument (David Copperfield). Todger's boarding-house is located near the Monument (Martin Chuzzlewit).
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Newgate Prison (Map: C-9) - Notorious London prison originally built at the new gate in the Medieval city's wall. It was the site of public executions in the 19th century. The prison was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 and rebuilt. It was destroyed again during the Gordon Riots of 1780 and rebuilt. New thinking in the way of the correction of prisoners in the early nineteenth century spelled the decline of Newgate. From 1850 it was used primarily to hold prisoners awaiting trial or execution. Newgate was sold to the City of London in 1898 for £40,000 and was demolished in 1902. The Old Bailey, London's Central Criminal Court located next door to the prison, was expanded on the site. For more information see Newgate - London's Prototype of Hell by Stephen Halliday

Oliver Twist visits Fagin in Newgate and witnesses his hanging (Oliver Twist). Hugh, Dennis, and Barnaby are imprisoned at Newgate in cells refitted after the prison was burned in the riots (Barnaby Rudge). Wemmick and Pip visit the prison while Pip is awaiting the arrival in London of Estella (Great Expectations). Dickens described Newgate in A visit to Newgate (Sketches by Boz). In the sketch Criminal Courts (Sketches by Boz), Dickens describes Newgate: 'How dreadful its rough heavy walls, and low massive doors, appeared to us - the latter looking as if they were made for the express purpose of letting people in, and never letting them out again.'
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Norfolk Street (Now Cleveland Street) (Map: B-4) - Charles' parents moved here in 1814 when he was 2 years old. The family lived here, over a greengrocer's shop, a second time and Charles gave this as his residence when he applied for a reader's ticket at the British Museum in 1830. The building survives as 22 Cleveland Street. The Cleveland Street Workhouse nearby is said to be the inspiration for Oliver Twist.
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The Obelisk (Map: G-8) - London landmark which stood in the center of St. George's Circus in Southwark. David has his box and money stolen by a young man with a donkey-cart near the Obelisk as he is running away from Murdstone and Grinby's to his aunt's home in Dover (David Copperfield).
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Oxford Street (Map: C-2) - A residential street in Dickens' time, John Jarndyce, Esther, Richard, and Ada have "cheerful lodging over an upholsterer's shop" near Oxford Street (Bleak House). In New York Dickens notes that "The streets and shops are lighted now; and as the eye travels down the long thoroughfare, dotted with bright jets of gas, it is reminded of Oxford Street or Piccadilly" (American Notes).
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Pall Mall (Map: E-4) - Broad, elegant street that derives its name from the Italian ball games played by Charles II.
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Paternoster Row (Map: D-9) - Long the center of London's publishing and bookselling trade.
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Pentonville (Map: A-6) - New and fashionable area of north London. Mr. Brownlow (Oliver Twist), Pancks (Little Dorrit), and Guppy (Bleak House) live here.
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Piccadilly (Map: E-3) - London street in the West End. Named for a 17th century tailor who had a shop there and made high ruff collars called piccadillies. Mr. Micawber fancies his family living in the upper part of a house, over some respectable business in Piccadilly (David Copperfield). The Lammles reside in Sackville Street in Piccadilly and Fascination Fledgeby has chambers at the Albany in Piccadilly (Our Mutual Friend).
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Pool of London (Map: E-11) - Dock area below London Bridge, farthest point upriver navigable by large ships.
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Regent's Park (Map: A-1) - London suburb laid out by John Nash (1752-1835) in 1811 during the Regency period. George III, incapacitated by mental illness in 1810, was replaced by his son (called the prince regent), later George IV. The period between 1810 and 1820, when George III died, became known as the Regency period. The Zoological Gardens opened in Regent's Park in 1828. Dickens lived at 3 Hanover Terrace and at 1 Devonshire Terrace (1839-1851) in Regent's Park.
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Regent Street (Map: D-3)- Street built between 1813 and 1819, during the Regency period. Lord Frederick Verisopht lives in "a handsome suite of private apartments in Regent Street" (Nicholas Nickleby).
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Royal Exchange (Map: C-11) - Called the 'Change, it was the meeting and bartering place for the merchants in the City. Ebenezer Scrooge (A Christmas Carol) and Paul Dombey (Dombey and Son) would have frequented the Royal Exchange.
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St. Bartholomew's Hospital (Map: C-9) - Founded in 1123, "Bart's" is London's oldest hospital. Bob Hopkins is a doctor here (Pickwick Papers). Mrs. Gamp's friend, Betsy Prig, is a nurse at St. Bartholomew's (Martin Chuzzlewit). John Baptist Cavalletto is taken there after being hit by the mail coach (Little Dorrit). The lawyer Jaggers has offices at Little Britain, just east of St. Bart's (Great Expectations).
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St. George's Church (Map: F-10) - Officially St. George the Martyr, this is believed to be the third church built on this site. The present building dates from the 1730s. Amy Dorrit is christened and married in the church which is near the Marshalsea prison where her father was a prisoner (Little Dorrit).
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St. James Palace (Map: F-4) - Built during the reign of Henry VIII and designed by Hans Holbien the Younger. Became the official residence of the monarchy after a fire destroyed Whitehall palace in 1698. It remained the official royal residence until 1837 when Queen Victoria moved to Buckingham Palace.
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St. James Park (Map: F-4) - Originally part of the grounds of St. James Palace. The park was landscaped for public use in 1829 by John Nash. Mr Twemlow lives in Duke St. just outside the park (Our Mutual Friend).
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St. James Square (Map: E-4) - Laid out in the 1660's on land owned by Henry Jermyn, Earl of St. Albans. The land was given to the Earl by Charles II after the Restoration because Jermyn had remained loyal during Charles' exile. Dennis plans to finance the removal of Dolly with loot that the rioters had thrown into "the convenient piece of water in the midst" of St. James Square (Barnaby Rudge).
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St. Lukes (Map: B-11) - St Luke's Hospital for the Insane. Dickens attended a holiday celebration with the inmates there on the day after Christmas 1851 and described the visit in the article, co-written with Wills, A Curious Dance Round a Curious Tree (Household Words) in January 1852.
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St. Paul's Cathedral (Map: D-9) - Long the focal point of the London skyline, the present St. Paul's Cathedral, built by Sir Christopher Wren from 1675 to 1711, replaced the old gothic cathedral which burned in the Great Fire of 1666. St. Paul's is part of the background scenery in many of Dickens' works. David takes Peggotty to the top of St. Paul's (David Copperfield).
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Scotland Yard (Map: E-6) - Home of the London's Metropolitan Police, created by Sir Robert Peel in 1829. Named for a Medieval palace on this site in Whitehall reserved for visiting kings and queens of Scotland. Described by Dickens in Scotland-Yard (Sketches by Boz).
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Seven Dials (Map: C-5) - Infamous slum and criminal district where seven streets converge at St. Giles. Dickens noted that a stranger who finds himself in The Dials for the first time will see enough around him to keep his curiosity and attention awake for no inconsiderable time (Seven Dials-Sketches by Boz). Dickens describes a visit to a miserable lodging house in St. Giles where the poor, mostly Irish emigrants, are "heaped upon the floor like maggots in cheese" (On Duty with Inspector Field - Household Words, June 1851).
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Smithfield (Map:B-9) - London's live cattle market. Cattle were driven through the streets until the mid 19th century. The market was moved to slaughterhouses in Islington in 1855. Smithfield was also the site of the annual Bartholomew's Fair from the 1600's until 1855. Oliver Twist and Sikes pass through Smithfield Market on their way to burglarize the Maylie home noting that "It was market-morning. The ground was covered, nearly ankle-deep, with filth and mire; a thick steam, perpetually rising from the reeking bodies of the cattle" (Oliver Twist). In A Parliamentary Sketch Dickens describes "the noise and confusion (in the House), to be met with in no other place in existence, not even excepting Smithfield on a market-day" (Sketches by Boz). While waiting for Mr. Jaggers, Pip goes to Smithfield "...and the shameful place, being all asmear with filth and fat and blood and foam, seemed to stick to me. So I rubbed it off with all possible speed..." (Great Expectations).
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Snow Hill (Map: C-9) - Steep and busy street leading from Holborn down to Farringdon Street. The Saracen's Head Inn, where Squeers headquartered when in London to advertise for pupils for Dotheboys Hall, was in Snow Hill (Nicholas Nickleby). Fagin's den is located in Saffron Hill near Snow Hill (Oliver Twist).
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Soho Square (Map: C-5) - Dr. Manette lived in a quiet street corner near here (A Tale of Two Cities). Caddy Jellyby meets Ester Summerson here (Bleak House), and Emma Haredale encounters Gabriel Vardon at a masquerade near here (Barnaby Rudge).
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Somerset House (Map: D-7) - Originally built in 1550 and was once a royal residence. It was demolished in 1775 and rebuilt, completed in 1836 to house government offices. Dickens' father and uncle were employed there.
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Southwark (Map: E-9) - District south of the Thames which includes the Borough. Southwark (pronounced suth-uck) was the scene of dense riverside warehouses and slums in Dickens' time.
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Southwark Bridge (Map: D-10) - Designed by John Rennie, built in 1815-1819 and replaced in 1912. Sometimes referred to as Iron Bridge. Amy Dorrit liked to walk there and John Chivery proposed to her on the bridge (Little Dorrit).
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Southwark Cathedral (Map: E-10) - Second oldest Gothic church in London after Westminster Abbey, it dates from the 12th century. In Dickens' time known as St. Savior's church, not achieving cathedral status until 1905. Dickens mentions St. Savior's in (Oliver Twist). William Shakespeare's brother Edmund is buried here.
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Spitalfields (Map: C-12) - Area east of the city named for the Priory and hospital of St Mary Spital. The area was resettled in the 17th century by French Huguenot refugees (protestants persecuted in France) who established a silk weaving industry there. The industry was in decline when Dickens described it in Spitalfields (Household Words) in April 1851 (article co-authored by W. H. Wills).
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Strand (Map: D-6) - Wide thoroughfare which connects Westminster to Fleet Street and the City. As a child Dickens worked at Warren's Blacking factory at Hungerford stairs in the west side of the Strand. As a young man he worked for several publications that had offices in this area. Later the offices of Household Words and All the Year Round, his weekly journals, were located in Wellington Street in the Strand. Mr. Haredale walks along the Strand after his house is burned and no one will give him shelter (Barnaby Rudge). David Copperfield finds a good shop to buy pudding in the Strand (David Copperfield). Martin Chuzzlewit, after great trouble, finds lodging for himself and Mark Tapley at a court in the Strand, not far from Temple Bar (Martin Chuzzlewit). The Nickleby's have lodging in the Strand at the home of Miss La Creevy (Nicholas Nickleby).
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Tavistock House (Map:B-5) - Dickens' home from 1851 to 1860 located at Tavistock Square. While living here Dickens and his wife, Catherine, separated. He purchased Gad's Hill Place, near Rochester, in 1856 and for four years maintained both residences. Tavistock House was demolished in 1901.
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The Temple (Map: D-8) - Area of London originally occupied by the Knights Templar, who protected pilgrims on their journey to the Holy Land. Later the Temple was occupied by two of the four Inns of Court, Inner Temple and Middle Temple. Pip has chambers at the Temple when he is visited by Magwitch (Great Expectations). Sir John Chester has chambers in the Temple (Barnaby Rudge). Mortimer Lightwood has chambers in the Temple (Our Mutual Friend). Stryver, lawyer who defends Charles Darnay, has chambers there (A Tale of Two Cities), and Tom Pinch works for an unknown employer in The Temple (Martin Chuzzlewit).
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Temple Bar (Map: C-7) - Archway, designed by Wren, used to mark the border between the City and Westminster where Fleet Street becomes the Strand. The archway caused major traffic congestion and was removed in 1878. Simon Tappertit has the 'prentices vow that in case of violence, Temple Bar will not be harmed (Barnaby Rudge). Jarvis Lorry works for Tellson's Bank near Temple Bar (A Tale of Two Cities).
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Thames Street (Map: D-9) - Street running along the river from Blackfriars to the Tower of London. Mrs Clennam's house is in Thames Street or nearby (Little Dorrit). Ralph Nickleby lodges Mrs Nickleby and Kate in an "old and gloomy" vacant house in Thames Street (Nicholas Nickleby). Joe Willet settles his fathers quarterly account with a vintner "down in some deep cellars hard by Thames Street" (Barnaby Rudge).
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Threadneedle Street (Map: C-11) - Street in The City whose main feature is the Bank of England, known as "The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street". The Cheeryble Brother's business is "in a quiet, shady little square" off Threadneedle Street (Nicholas Nickleby).
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The Tower (Map: E-13) - Built on the site of Roman fortifications, the central part of the Tower, known as the White Tower, was built in 1078 by William the Conqueror. Subsequent rings of fortification were added later. It was used as a royal residence as well as a prison and place of execution until Elizabethan times. England's child king, Edward V, and his brother were murdered in the Tower in 1483 supposedly by their uncle, Richard III. The crown jewels are guarded here by the Beefeaters. Sam Weller refers to the killing of Edward V in the Tower (Pickwick Papers). Mr. And Mrs. Daniel Quilp live on Tower Hill (The Old Curiosity Shop). David takes Peggotty sightseeing to the Tower (David Copperfield). Pip, Herbert, and Startop row past the Tower while attempting to help Magwitch escape England (Great Expectations).
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Tottenham Court Road (Map: B-4) - Street running north from St Giles Circus containing many drapers' shops. Miss Knag's brother, Mortimer,has a stationer's shop here (Nicholas Nickleby). Peggotty helps Traddles recover his property from a broker's shop here (David Copperfield).
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Trafalgar Square (Map: E-5) - Created during the 1830's and 1840's the Square replaced the royal stables. It is named for the Spanish cape Trafalgar. It was off this cape that Admiral Nelson defeated the Spanish and French fleets in 1805. Nelson's Column, at the Square, commemorates this victory.
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Tyburn (Map: C-1) - Place of public execution until 1783 when they were moved to Newgate Prison. Dennis the hangman was executioner at Tyburn (Barnaby Rudge).
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Vauxhall Bridge (Map: I-5) - A cast iron bridge built in 1811 and was originally called Regent's Bridge. It was replaced in 1906. Bradley Headstone and Charlie Hexam encounter Eugene Wrayburn on Vauxhall Bridge (Our Mutual Friend).
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Vauxhall Gardens (Map: I-6) - Fashionable garden resort of the 18th and early 19th centuries. Jonathon Tyers made extensive improvements in the gardens in the early 1700's and it became one of London's favorite public attractions. Concerts, plays, and even fireworks entertained the crowds there. By the mid 1800's the park had fallen out of favor and drew more disreputable crowds. The gardens were closed in 1859. Dickens describes Vauxhall Gardens in Vauxhall Gardens by Day (Sketches by Boz). Mr. Stryver proposes to take Miss Manette to Vauxhall Gardens (A Tale of Two Cities).
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Wapping (Map: D-13) - East London riverside district, home of the London Docks built between 1800 and 1820.
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Warren's Blacking Factory (Map: E-6) - Boot polish factory where 12-year-old Dickens was sent to work, fixing labels to bottles of blacking, to help support his family. Dickens had dreams of becoming a gentleman and was humiliated working with the rough men and boys at the factory. The experience had a major impact on Dickens later life and works and also on his relationship with his mother who, after Charles left the factory as the result of a quarrel between his father and the owners of the factory, argued unsuccessfully to have him sent back. Dickens relates the misery he felt during this time in the fictionalized account of David Copperfield working at Murdstone and Grinby's warehouse (David Copperfield). Warren's Blacking Factory was located at 30 Hungerford Stairs, the Strand. A ferry operated at the stairs until 1845 when Hungerford foot bridge opened , hoping to spur trade at Hungerford Market. The market was torn down in 1860 to make way for Charing Cross railway station and the footbridge was replaced by a railway bridge in 1863. The railway company argued that few people used the footbridge due to the smell from the river. The Micawbers take temporary lodging in a "little, dirty, tumble-down public-house" at Hungerford stairs before emigrating to Australia (David Copperfield).
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Waterloo Bridge (Map: E-7) - Designed by John Rennie, Waterloo Bridge opened in 1817. Originally to be named Strand Bridge, the name was changed to commemorate Wellington's victory over Napoleon in 1815 at Waterloo. It was demolished in 1939 and in 1945 it was replaced by a bridge designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott. Sam Weller tells Pickwick that he once had "unfurnished lodgins' for a fortnight" under the dry arches of Waterloo Bridge (Pickwick Papers). On patrol with Thames police officer 'Pea', Dickens is introduced to 'Waterloo', night toll-taker on Waterloo Bridge, who describes suicides and other unusual events he has seen (Down with the Tide, Household Words, February 1853).
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Wellington Street (Map: D-6) - Editorial offices for Dickens' weekly magazine All the Year Round were located at number 26 (formerly 11). Dickens kept an apartment over the office during the 1860s following his separation from Catherine. The building now houses the Charles Dickens Coffee House.
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Westminster (Map: G-4) - Originally the city of Westminster before London expanded during the 19th century and absorbed it. Whitehall, St. James, and Buckingham Palaces, as well as Westminster Abbey, are located here.
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Westminster Abbey (Map: F-5) - The most famous of England's churches. Originally built by Edward the Confessor in 1050, the abbey was rebuilt in its present Gothic style starting in 1245. Henry VII added his Chapel shortly before his death in 1509. England's monarchs since William the Conqueror in 1066 have been crowned here. Many of England's kings and queens are buried at Westminster Abbey as are many of its famous citizens including Chaucer, Newton, and Darwin. Charles Dickens was buried in Poet's Corner, in the Abbey on June 14, 1870. Pip and Herbert Pocket attend services in the Abbey (Great Expectations). Mould the undertaker tells Mrs. Gamp that gold can buy a gentleman a tomb in Westminster Abbey if he chooses to invest in such a purchase (Martin Chuzzlewit).
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Westminster Bridge (Map: F-6) - Westminster Bridge was the second bridge over the Thames, after London Bridge. Built of stone, work began in 1739 and was completed in 1750. This bridge was replaced in 1862. David Copperfield crosses Westminster Bridge with Mr. Peggotty in his search for Emily (David Copperfield). Barnaby and his mother cross Westminster Bridge on their journey back to London after hiding out in the country (Barnaby Rudge).
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Whitechapel (Map: D-13) - City located outside the walled city at Aldgate. Named for the whitewashed Chapel of Ease that became a parish church in 1320. Noted for many coaching inns for travelers in Dickens' time. Pickwick, Sam Weller, Mr. Weller Sr., and Mr. Peter Magnus leave for Ipswich from the Bull Inn here (Pickwick Papers). John Willet sends Joe to London with credit to eat at the Black Lion on the Whitechapel Road (Barnaby Rudge). David Copperfield, arrives in London for the first time, stays at an inn in Whitechapel, and relates "I forget whether it was the Blue Bull, or the Blue Boar; but I know it was the Blue something" (David Copperfield).
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Whitehall (Map: E-5) - District of Westminster named for the royal palace built here in 1532 by Henry VIII. The prime minister's residence of number 10 Downing street and other government offices are located here.
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Whitehall Banqueting Hall (Map: F-5) - Designed by Inigo Jones in 1622 and featuring ceiling paintings by Peter Paul Rubens, it survived a fire that destroyed much of Whitehall in 1698.
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Notes:

1 - Drawings of old London by Philip Norman. Victoria and Albert Museum. Dept. of Engraving, Illustration, and Design,Norman, Philip, 1842-1931



























































Aldgate The Adelphi Bank of England Bedlam Belgrave Square Billingsgate Bishopsgate Blackfriars Bridge Bloomsbury Bond Street The Borough British Museum Buckingham Palace Camden Town Cannon Street Cavendish Square Chancery Lane Charing Cross Cheapside Chelsea The City Clerkenwell Cornhill Covent Garden Crystal Palace Devonshire Terrace Doughty Street Drury Lane Fleet Prison Fleet Street Furnival's Inn Golden Square Gray's Inn Green Park Grosvenor Square Guildhall Holborn Houses of Parliament Hyde Park Jacobs Island King's Bench Prison Lambeth Lambeth Palace Leadenhall Street Leicester Square Lincoln's Inn Field London Bridge Ludgate The Marshalsea The Monument Newgate Prison The Obelisk Oxford Street Pall Mall Paternoster Row Piccadilly Regent's Park Regent Street Royal Exchange St Bartholomew's Hospital St James Palace St James Park St James Square Scotland Yard Seven Dials Smithfield Snow Hill Somerset House Southwark Southwark Bridge Strand Tavistock House The Temple Temple Bar Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese Thames Street Threadneedle Street The Tower Tottenham Ct Road Trafalgar Square Tyburn Vauxhall Bridge Vauxhall Gardens Warren's Blacking Factory Westminster Westminster Abbey Westminster Bridge Whitechapel Whitehall Whitehall Banqueting Hall Spitalfields Pool of London St Lukes Pentonville Model Prison Kensington City Road Horsemonger Lane Gaol Foundling Hospital Lant Street Brick Lane Astley's Doctors' Commons Guy's Hospital Mansion House George and Vulture Inn Millbank St. George's Church The George Inn Southwark Cathedral Norfolk Street Soho Square Wellington Street Millbank Penitentiary Buckingham Street Bull Inn Bevis Marks Bleeding Heart Yard Waterloo Bridge St. Paul's Cathedral